Tag: geology

Twin Arches in Tennessee

On The Trail

Nature, Photography April 22, 2019

Enjoy this photography of a trail at the Twin Arches in Tennessee. Following along the contours of impressive sandstone bluffs, I was pleased to discover and explore this wonderful National Park. You can enjoy it, also – in your home or at work – by visiting my gallery at Pixels. Pick out a print and enjoy the great outdoors!

Hiking the great state of Tennessee

Concave Sandstone Bluff

Nature, Photography April 21, 2019

I photographed this interesting sandstone bluff at Twin Arches in the Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area, in Tennessee. The concave structure provided a ceiling, of sorts, extending perhaps 30 feet. Now, you can enjoy this geological structure in your home or office, available on a variety of different print-types to suit your wishes. See my gallery at Pixels for more!

Adventure awaits in Cumberland Mountains

Hiking The Twin Arches At Big South Fork

Nature, Photography April 18, 2019

Part 2

See Part One: Twin Arches At Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area

Time and weather permitting, you’ll have a great time hiking the Twin Arches! Here’s a short video from under the North Arch

I also shot several photographs of this interesting geological destination, which are now available as prints in my gallery at Pixels. Here are a few examples –

Hope to see you soon. In the meantime…

Enjoy the great outdoors!

Twin Arches At Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area

Twin Arches At Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area

Nature, Photography April 17, 2019

Part One

I recently visited the Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area, which encompasses 125,000 acres of the Cumberland Plateau – in both Kentucky and Tennessee – and boasts miles of scenic gorges and sandstone bluffs.

With many sights to see, I decided to hike the Twin Arches, described as “the most impressive rock arches in the eastern United States”. The North Arch has a clearance of 51 feet, a span of 93 feet and its top deck is 62 feet high, while the South Arch has a clearance of 70 feet, a span of 135 feet and its top deck is 103 feet high.

North Arch
South Arch

Here’s a video taken at the South Arch…

A sign at the park provided this description as to how these arches were formed:

Weaker layers of sandstone form the base of the nearly vertical walls of this narrow ridge. The weathering of these erosion-susceptible layers caused sections of the wall to fall away, forming shallow rock shelters on both sides of the ridge.

The collapse and shelter enlarging process continued until two “windows” in the narrow ridge were formed. This opening enlarged until it reached the stronger and more erosion-resistant sandstone layer of rim rock that caps the Twin Arches.

A cave was situated under one end of the South Arch, so I entered to discover that there was an exit at the back, albeit a narrow passage at approx. 18″ wide. Footprint-impressions in the sand from hikers provided some assurance that the cave was empty – no bats or bears. But, watch your step & don’t bump your head!

Here’s a short video as I entered the cave…

The top of the arches are one contiguous surface area, accessible by stairs, though the South Arch has additional areas visitors may ascend so as to attain the best view:

At the pinnacle, scenic views were truly spectacular on this fine day – unique walls of eroded sandstone, mountains and valleys lined with trees, and an interesting cap-rock area to walkabout. Here are a few examples:

Here’s a video of the surrounding environment –

Partial Map of Park

The only complaint I had while visiting the Twin Arches is Divide Road. As soon as you leave TN-154, you can expect to travel for nearly 5 miles along a gravel road which is narrow with frequent & deep potholes, many hidden by shadows from trees lining the road. So, to be safe, I drove this stretch at less than 10 m.p.h..

Keep in mind, however, that the most impressive sights to see at the Twin Arches are at ground level. So, stay tuned for Part Two

Layers of Sand Throw Pillow

Layers of Sand Throw Pillow

Nature, Products November 17, 2017

This abstract golden-orange digital artwork is based on a photograph of tidal sands. You won’t have to go to the beach to enjoy the sand, however. Simply select this throw pillow instead, and spruce up your living spaces! It’s 26″ by 26″ (several smaller sizes available, too), printed on both sides and has a concealed zipper opening for a clean look and easy care. Enjoy!

Green Valley Landscape Poster

Green Valley Sci Fi Landscape Poster

Products, Science Fiction October 22, 2017

Enjoy this science fiction landscape poster on a wall in your home! It’s available in three sizes, with custom framing options. Gallery quality Giclée print on natural white, matte, ultra smooth, 100% cotton rag, acid and lignin free archival paper using Epson K3 archival inks. Custom trimmed with 2″ border for framing.

Circle of Stones iPhone Skin

Colorful Circle of Stones iPhone Skin

Patterns, Products August 14, 2017

Available for several different models, this iPhone skin features a patterned presentation of colorful stones. From Society 6 –

Skins are thin, easy-to-remove, vinyl decals for customizing your device. Skins are made from a patented material that eliminates air bubbles and wrinkles for easy application.

Miners Castle

Miners Castle

Nature, Structures July 7, 2016

Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is home to Miners Castle, a popular geological attraction on Lake Superior in Michigan’s upper peninsula located between the cities of Munising and Grand Marais. This digitally adapted imagery is based on a photograph taken in 1996, about ten years before the right tower broke off and fell 90’ into the water below. Guests are welcome to visit my gallery at Pixels for prints and more.