Categories
Nature Photography

Ozone Falls State Natural Area

See Recent Post: Return To Ozone Falls

Welcome

Situated on the eastern edge of the Crab Orchard Mountains on the Cumberland Plateau, in Cumberland County, Tennessee, Ozone Falls is the third tallest waterfall in the state with an elevation of 110-feet. And, after splashing into the plunge pool, Fall Creek disappears underground – like magic! Approximately 30-feet away, however, the creek re-emerges from under several huge boulders, at a lower point downstream.

I visited the falls following a day of rain. As such, I encountered many slippery rock-surfaces along the trail down into the gorge. Hikers should use caution – walking sticks are a good idea – and appropriate footwear is strongly recommended!

Photography

Here are some photographs from Ozone Falls State Natural Area

Prints

Perhaps you’d enjoy one of my photographs in your home, or office? If so, then please visit my gallery at Pixels to select a print type to suit your interests.

Video

From the base of Ozone Falls, near the plunge pool –

Categories
Nature Photography

Photographs From Different Trails

Here are some random photographs from different hikes in the state of Tennessee:

Prints are available in my gallery at Pixels.

Categories
Nature Photography

Piney Falls State Natural Area

UPDATE: see new post – Upper Piney Falls

I recently enjoyed hiking the 440-acre Piney Falls State Natural Area, located in Rhea County where Little Piney and Soak Creek have carved deep gorges into the Cumberland Plateau. It’s recognized by the U.S. Dept. of Interior as a National Natural Landmark, one of fourteen in Tennessee, featuring rare virgin forests.

If you’d be interested in visiting the park, here’s a map:

Note: there are no restrooms or gift shop, and limited signage.

Waterfalls

There are two waterfalls at the park, Upper and Lower Piney Falls.

Upper Piney Falls is 80′ high, the top of which is easily accessible by trail. It features a concave ledge which circles behind and around the falls where visitors can enjoy an awe-inspiring view of the gorge below. Getting to the plunge pool, however, is more difficult; in addition to traversing a narrow trail along the upper rim of the gorge, hikers must then descend a steep, rocky surface, safeguarded to some degree via provision of connected cable for support. Exercise caution!

Here are some photographs of Upper Piney Falls

Here’s a short video of Upper Piney Falls

Following the trail down to Lower Piney Falls, which stands 40′ high, hikers arrive at the top of the falls for a picturesque view into a taller, narrow gorge. Unfortunately, there are no trails to access the plunge pool nor lower slopes below, which feature an old growth forest of tall white pines and eastern hemlocks.

Prints

If you’d like a print for your home or office, then please visit my gallery at Pixels. There you’ll discover a variety of options – framed, canvas, art, metal, wood, acrylic – in addition to general merchandise items.

Thanks for stopping by!

Categories
Nature Photography

Cane Creek Falls, Tennessee

The following collection of photographs features Cane Creek Falls – a portion of the many shots I took while recently hiking Fall Creek Falls State Park, in Tennessee.

Prints of Cane Creek Falls – and other areas of the park – are available for your review in my gallery at Pixels. Selections include framed, canvas, art, wood, acrylic and metal prints. Other items available, too – stop by to see more!

If you’d like to visit the park, follow these directions:

Cane Creek Falls

Standing 85′ tall, Cane Creek Falls can be seen from the Nature Center (10821 Park Road), located near the entrance of Fall Creek Falls State Park. Guests may enjoy views of this waterfall and the sandstone gorge from either of two observation platforms, one of which provides easy access for handicapped visitors.

Here are some photographs of Cane Creek Falls

Next, to connect with the hiking trail near the Nature Center, it was necessary to walk along a suspension bridge in order to cross Cane Creek:

Supported with two expansive cables, the bridge was relatively unstable and shifted with each step. As such, I was later pleased with how well the next photograph turned out – taken from the center of the bridge:

Across the creek and then up some stairs, a sometimes rocky trail awaited my steps:

Another Point of View

I continued my hike around this first gorge, until I discovered another area from which to view Cane Creek Falls. Approaching this spot wasn’t easy – don’t trip over the edge! – nor was it necessarily prudent to cross the rudimentary fencing for a better photograph. Look closely at the third picture to see a man standing (left side) on the observation deck – across the gorge – located by the Nature Center:

I hope that you enjoyed this post, and please consider purchasing a print if interested. More pictures of my hike at Fall Creek Falls State Park in Tennessee will be forthcoming; until such time, thanks for visiting!