Gitche Gumee

The Big Lake

The legend lives on…this is Lake Superior, referred to by the Chippewa Indians as “Gitche Gumee” – the Big Lake. I took this photograph in the upper peninsula of Michigan, near Little Presque Isle outside of Marquette. If that’s too far to drive, you can always visit my galleries at Pixels and Redbubble to enjoy The Great Lakes.

Black And White Archway

Historic Structure

This black and white photography features an archway into the Law Quad, located in Ann Arbor on the campus of the University of Michigan. An example of Greek Revival architecture, you can enjoy a print of this in your home or office. Visit my gallery and select an appropriate print type to suit your interests. Framed prints may be customized. Other items available, also.

Thanks for stopping by!

Vintage Lighthouse

Marquette, Michigan


Located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula on Lake Superior, this old Coast Guard Station served for many years as a beacon for maritime activity. If you’d be interested in a print, please visit my gallery at Pixels to select the print type best suited for your purposes.

Little Presque Isle

Island of Gitche Gumee

Imagine…the shores of Lake Superior, at Little Presque Isle, north of Marquette, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula…on a wall in your home, office, business lobby or cafeteria setting. Get the picture?

Shores of Lake Superior

Little Presque Isle

It’s often said that a person can never go home again; that is, everything changes with time. Memories fade, often becoming embellished and romanticized, and the environment from which recollections stem are also altered. Yet, with a refined sense of appreciation – and, at just the right moment – magic can happen.

This was my experience upon returning to the shores of Lake Superior, the place of my childhood, as seen here – outside the city of Marquette, in Michigan’s upper peninsula, along the beach near Little Presque Isle.

The dynamism of a shoreline governed by powerful forces of nature – i.e., Lake Superior – provided a compelling, beautiful visual and spiritual experience, beyond my reminiscence. A great day, indeed!

Prints available.

Everyday Spaces

Prints available. This black and white photograph was taken inside Nickels Arcade in Ann Arbor, on the campus of the University of Michigan, and features a confluence of angled walls and windows.

Tale of A Cat

Growing up on Lake Superior in the upper peninsula of Michigan, in the small city of Marquette, our family always had pets. And, at one point, we owned a black-and-gray striped cat named Bootsy.

He was an indoor-outdoor cat, and, when inside, enjoyed sitting by the large picture window in the living room, at the front of the house.

There were lots of kids in the neighborhood at that time, so it was common for friends to come over and visit. We also had a doorbell with a glowing light.

Once, the doorbell rang and I went to see who it was, opening only the main door but not the screen door. I looked but nobody was there.

At that time, a common prank which children enjoyed was called ditching doorbells – ringing someone’s doorbell & running away.

Assuming this was the case, I closed the door and began to walk back into the house. Just then, it rang again. I turned around quickly and opened both doors, stepping out on to the front porch to see who it was – but, there was no person in sight.

However, an explanation quickly became apparent. It was our cat!

As the front porch was visible from the living room window, he could see people come to our house, press the glowing doorbell, hear the sound of the doorbell, and then watch us react by opening the door.

On his own, Bootsy learned he could get on the milk box, and then jump up on top of the mailbox, from which he could lean against the doorbell, letting us know when he wanted to come inside. That education was a game-changer for a cat.

The question: did we own the cat, or did he own us? I think the latter.

Flashback: Grateful Dead

What A Long Strange Trip

A friend from Cleveland, Ohio, Brian Daley, showed up at my apartment in Holland, Michigan during the summer of 1985, asking if I’d be interested in traveling to Wisconsin to hear the Grateful Dead perform back-to-back shows. After gathering my backpack, we then scoured the town in order to purchase the only remaining original formula Coca Cola available – following the recent change – and hit the road in his Honda Prelude.

Along the way, we must have bumped into at least a dozen people on the road that Brian, a Deadhead, knew from various shows he’d attended. That seemed rather unlikely – what were the odds? – though, less so upon arrival at the venue.

We set up a tent on the edge of a farmer’s field near the concert grounds, purchased tickets and proceeded to the first show, on Friday night. It was an excellent concert, though it took quite a while to exit the amphitheater, afterwards; something was obstructing the door at the top of the hill.

Once finally outside, we saw that a large car (a dark blue, Oldsmobile Delta 88) had parked crosswise, directly in front of the exit. That car belonged to friends of ours – Bernie, Libby & Roger – from Holland, Michigan, who heard that we had gone to the show and took a road trip to join us. Realizing that we would likely be very difficult to locate among the crowd, they decided to be as conspicuous as possible. Indeed!

The Shows


PHOTO CREDIT: modified photo from unsplash.com.

The Mackinac Bridge

The Mackinac Bridge is the longest suspension bridge in the western hemisphere, with a total length of 26,372 feet. Spanning the Straits of Mackinac from St. Ignace to Mackinaw City, it connects Michigan’s upper and lower peninsulas and opened for traffic in 1957.

Find products in my shops: Redbubble, Society 6Zazzle and Pixels.

Here are a few samples…

Bridge Over Icy Waters

I took this photograph several years ago while it was snowing in Michigan. Specifically, this is a branch of the Huron River, as seen from Island Drive in Ann Arbor. Prints available through Pixels and ArtFlakes. Thanks for stopping by!

Birch Tree

Prints available. Like human beings, birch trees have character, weathered through time over the years with markings and scars – imperfections, which, in my opinion, make the tree more perfect.

Enjoy the great outdoors!