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Disc Golf Disc Golf Stories Miscellaneous

Disc Golf Stories, No. 10

In June of 1998, myself and three friends – Mike Milne, Jon Poole and Jeff Knudsen – traveled from Scottsdale, Arizona, to Sylmar, California, to compete in a weekend disc golf tournament called the “3rd Summertime Open”.

For some reason which I cannot recall, a makeshift course had been established at the Veterans Memorial Park. The event consisted of two 18-hole rounds on Saturday, and a final 24-hole round to be played on Sunday.

During the third round while playing on one of the added baskets, I birdied using my midrange Comet disc as a putter – a slightly downhill anhyzer putt around a tree, flattening to finish left. A somewhat unorthodox shot, though I did record the only birdie and took honors on the tee pad.

The next fairway was up the side of a hill, with the basket visible on the top and front edge. Also visible was a road (OB, penalty stroke) running across the fairway – situated at a distance, which, as we each discussed, may be within reach of a long drive?

I decided to put everything I had into my drive, believing that I could throw far enough to land safely beyond the road. I crushed it, with 4-feet to spare! However, my disc grabbed the hillside turf and spit backwards, finishing to rest barely in-bounds and teetering on the top edge of the curb. Seeing this, the following three competitors, as I would have, all played it safe with shorter drives.

I was last to play my second shot and first needed to spot my mark to the side, in order so that I was able to throw from within the fairway boundary. With approx. 150-feet remaining, I launched my Magnet putter uphill and into the chains for the only birdie in our group!

I played well in two of three rounds during the tournament. Not enough to win, but I nevertheless fondly recall my uphill deuce.

Categories
Disc Golf Disc Golf Stories Miscellaneous

Disc Golf Stories, No. 9

I was competing in a PDGA sanctioned disc golf tournament on a warm day with mild winds during the summer of 1999. The event was held at Cold Brook Park, located in Climax, Michigan, between Kalamazoo and Battle Creek.

At that time, organizers commonly added six alternate baskets to the 18-hole layout, in order to accommodate a larger field of players. The first new basket in this expanded 24-hole format followed the 16th hole, and was a short birdie opportunity along the edge of Portage Lake.

Everything seemed fine as our group approached the tee pad. The wind was calm and there weren’t any trees as obstacles, only a water hazard to avoid along the right edge of the fairway.

And then, it happened.

From out of nowhere, a small gaggle of geese flew closely overhead at a high rate of speed! They couldn’t have been more than 10-feet above the ground, riding the leading edge of a weather system. We all ducked, rising again only to be immediately greeted by headwinds of approx. 30 miles per hour, sustained for the remainder of the tournament.

So much for an easy shot – now, the water loomed large.