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Nature Photography

Mountain Macro

Close-up photography in black and white of Black Mountain, as seen along the Cumberland Trail near Crab Orchard, Tennessee. See more.

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Nature Photography

Nemo Bridge Trail At Obed

History

Photograph (above, modified) & information (below) from placard located on site.

After the Civil War, saw and grist mills emerged in Tennessee’s Morgan and Cumberland counties. Corn meal, flour, logs, and other goods from the early lumber and pulp industries were shipped along this bridge.

The Cincinnati Southern Railway was built across the Cumberland Plateau here at Nemo in the 1870s. It became part of the Southern Railway system in the late 1890s. Many small extensions like the Catoosa Railroad were built to tap timber, coal, and other natural resources.

The epic flood of 1929 destroyed the means by which workers made a living, ripping up railway lines and washing away virtually every mill and building in its path – just as America sank into the Great Depression.

The Hike

I recently visited Wartburg, Tennessee, where I enjoyed a 5 mile (roundtrip) hike along the Nemo Bridge Trail to Alley Ford. Located in the Obed Wild And Scenic River National Park, the trailhead begins at the Rock Creek Campground and continues 14.2 miles to the distant Devils Breakfast Table.

The hike to Alley Ford is rated as moderately difficult with several changes in elevation. There is also a very rocky downhill section of the trail near the end which requires deliberate footing. It was a cold 30-degrees when I began the hike, along which I encountered layers of rain-soaked leaves, creating slippery conditions and, periodically, effectively camouflaging the trail.

Along the way I enjoyed seeing many different sandstone cliffs, colorful autumn foliage, a large group of wild turkeys, and, at the end, the Obed River. Due to recent rains, though, many of the river-rocks otherwise visible at Alley Ford were covered in water.

Photographs

Prints

Visit my online shop to discover quality prints for your home and/or office!

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Nature Photography

Killdeer Arch

Part Six – Pogue Creek Canyon State Natural Area

Back on the trail, I hiked up and down various changes in elevation, crossed a few small streams, and also experienced a close encounter with bears! Finally, as I neared the point – a scenic overlook – at which I’d turn around, I saw a sign for the “Killdeer Arch”.

This natural arch provides passage through a tall sandstone cliff along the Upper Canyon Trail, offering vertical clearance of 8 feet by 20 feet wide.

Photographs

Prints

If you enjoy nature, hiking outdoors and/or geology, you may be interested in a print featuring one of my photographs! If so, please visit my gallery to select images of “Killdeer Arch” from the Pogue Creek Canyon State Natural Area.

Video

Here’s a short video of “Killdeer Arch” –

More Pictures

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Nature Photography

Circle Bar Arch

Part Five – Pogue Creek Canyon State Natural Area

Moving right along, it wasn’t long before I spotted this sign. Though I hadn’t heard anything about an area referred to as “Circle Bar Arch”, it was only 100 feet uphill from the trail, and the Pogue Creek Canyon State Natural Area seemed to be full of interesting surprises.

Indeed. When I reached the top I was greeted by a broad sandstone wall, filled with intricate contours, crevices and arches.

Photographs

Home Decor

Please visit my gallery if you would enjoy a photograph on a wall in your home, or elsewhere. There are several print types to select, with customization options, too. Thanks for stopping by!

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Nature Products

Turkey Roost Rockhouse

I recently hiked the Pogue Creek Canyon State Natural Area, located in Tennessee near Jamestown. It’s off the beaten trail, and known for it’s…

Awesome Geological Structures

It also has black bears living in the canyon – see earlier post. Most of all, however, the sandstone cliffs provide a spectacular visual experience! One of the first areas hikers encounter along the trail is the Turkey Roost Rockhouse:

Home Decor

If you’d be interested in a print for your home – or office, lobby, cafeteria – then visit my gallery at Pixels. You’ll find many options available (framed, canvas, art, metal, wood and acrylic). And, select features allow you to customize it to make it your own!

More

I’ll be posting more photographs from the Pogue Creek Canyon State Natural Area in the days ahead – there’s so much to see, so stop back often!!!

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Nature Photography

Cave In A Cliff

Beyond these rocks is a cave leading into a chamber within a sandstone cliff, located in Tennessee at Big South Fork State Park. Visitors can enjoy a picture – framed, canvas, art, metal, wood or acrylic – from my gallery at Pixels.

Thanks for stopping by!

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Nature Photography

Photographs From Different Trails

Here are some random photographs from different hikes in the state of Tennessee:

Prints are available in my gallery at Pixels.

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Nature Photography

Piney Falls Gorge Trail

Having observed that the gorge below Lower Piney Falls (Tennessee) wasn’t easily accessible, I hiked back uphill and sought to secure a path of descent further along the river. Alas, it was not to be. However, on this half-hour side excursion, I did have the opportunity to see some very interesting rock formations.

Visit my gallery at Pixels for more.

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Nature Photography

Piney Falls State Natural Area

UPDATE: see new post – Upper Piney Falls

I recently enjoyed hiking the 440-acre Piney Falls State Natural Area, located in Rhea County where Little Piney and Soak Creek have carved deep gorges into the Cumberland Plateau. It’s recognized by the U.S. Dept. of Interior as a National Natural Landmark, one of fourteen in Tennessee, featuring rare virgin forests.

If you’d be interested in visiting the park, here’s a map:

Note: there are no restrooms or gift shop, and limited signage.

Waterfalls

There are two waterfalls at the park, Upper and Lower Piney Falls.

Upper Piney Falls is 80′ high, the top of which is easily accessible by trail. It features a concave ledge which circles behind and around the falls where visitors can enjoy an awe-inspiring view of the gorge below. Getting to the plunge pool, however, is more difficult; in addition to traversing a narrow trail along the upper rim of the gorge, hikers must then descend a steep, rocky surface, safeguarded to some degree via provision of connected cable for support. Exercise caution!

Here are some photographs of Upper Piney Falls

Here’s a short video of Upper Piney Falls

Following the trail down to Lower Piney Falls, which stands 40′ high, hikers arrive at the top of the falls for a picturesque view into a taller, narrow gorge. Unfortunately, there are no trails to access the plunge pool nor lower slopes below, which feature an old growth forest of tall white pines and eastern hemlocks.

Prints

If you’d like a print for your home or office, then please visit my gallery at Pixels. There you’ll discover a variety of options – framed, canvas, art, metal, wood, acrylic – in addition to general merchandise items.

Thanks for stopping by!

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Nature Photography

Cane Creek Falls, Tennessee

The following collection of photographs features Cane Creek Falls – a portion of the many shots I took while recently hiking Fall Creek Falls State Park, in Tennessee.

Prints of Cane Creek Falls – and other areas of the park – are available for your review in my gallery at Pixels. Selections include framed, canvas, art, wood, acrylic and metal prints. Other items available, too – stop by to see more!

If you’d like to visit the park, follow these directions:

Cane Creek Falls

Standing 85′ tall, Cane Creek Falls can be seen from the Nature Center (10821 Park Road), located near the entrance of Fall Creek Falls State Park. Guests may enjoy views of this waterfall and the sandstone gorge from either of two observation platforms, one of which provides easy access for handicapped visitors.

Here are some photographs of Cane Creek Falls

Next, to connect with the hiking trail near the Nature Center, it was necessary to walk along a suspension bridge in order to cross Cane Creek:

Supported with two expansive cables, the bridge was relatively unstable and shifted with each step. As such, I was later pleased with how well the next photograph turned out – taken from the center of the bridge:

Across the creek and then up some stairs, a sometimes rocky trail awaited my steps:

Another Point of View

I continued my hike around this first gorge, until I discovered another area from which to view Cane Creek Falls. Approaching this spot wasn’t easy – don’t trip over the edge! – nor was it necessarily prudent to cross the rudimentary fencing for a better photograph. Look closely at the third picture to see a man standing (left side) on the observation deck – across the gorge – located by the Nature Center:

I hope that you enjoyed this post, and please consider purchasing a print if interested. More pictures of my hike at Fall Creek Falls State Park in Tennessee will be forthcoming; until such time, thanks for visiting!

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Nature Photography

Tree On Rocks

I recently visited the Frozen Head State Park And Natural Area in Tennessee, where I photographed this scenic outcropping along the South Old Mac Trail. Now, prints are available in my gallery at Pixels – framed, art, canvas, wood, acrylic and metal.

Check it out…

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Nature Photography

Mountain Top

Hiking at the Twin Arches in the Big South Fork National Park, located in Tennessee, I climbed to the top for a wide open view.

See more in my gallery at Pixels

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Nature Photography

Sandstone Wall

At the Twin Arches in Big South Fork National Park, in Tennessee, many gorges featured scenic sandstone bluffs. See my gallery at Pixels for more.

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Nature Photography

Sandstone Layers

This photograph was taken at the Twin Arches in Big South Fork National Park, in Tennessee, and features many layers of eroding sandstone. If you’d be interested in a print for your home, then visit my gallery at Pixels.

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Nature Photography

On The Trail

Enjoy this photography of a trail at the Twin Arches in Tennessee. Following along the contours of impressive sandstone bluffs, I was pleased to discover and explore this wonderful National Park. You can enjoy it, also – in your home or at work – by visiting my gallery at Pixels. Pick out a print and enjoy the great outdoors!

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Nature Photography

Concave Sandstone Bluff

I photographed this interesting sandstone bluff at Twin Arches in the Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area, in Tennessee. The concave structure provided a ceiling, of sorts, extending perhaps 30 feet. Now, you can enjoy this geological structure in your home or office, available on a variety of different print-types to suit your wishes. See my gallery at Pixels for more!

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Nature Photography

Top of South Arch

While hiking at the Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area, in Tennessee, I climbed to the top of South Arch to shoot this photograph. If you’d be interested in a print, then visit my gallery at Pixels. Many print types are available for your review, as are customization options to make it your own!

Enjoy the great outdoors!

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Nature Photography

Light In A Cave

While visiting the Twin Arches in Tennessee, I explored this small cave featuring a gap at that back that allowed light to stream inside. I’ve added this photograph to my gallery at Pixels, where many prints are available to select – so, check it out…

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Nature Photography

Hiking The Twin Arches At Big South Fork

Part 2

See Part One: Twin Arches At Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area

Time and weather permitting, you’ll have a great time hiking the Twin Arches! Here’s a short video from under the North Arch

I also shot several photographs of this interesting geological destination, which are now available as prints in my gallery at Pixels. Here are a few examples –

Hope to see you soon. In the meantime…

Enjoy the great outdoors!

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Nature Photography

Twin Arches At Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area

Part One

I recently visited the Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area, which encompasses 125,000 acres of the Cumberland Plateau – in both Kentucky and Tennessee – and boasts miles of scenic gorges and sandstone bluffs.

With many sights to see, I decided to hike the Twin Arches, described as “the most impressive rock arches in the eastern United States”. The North Arch has a clearance of 51 feet, a span of 93 feet and its top deck is 62 feet high, while the South Arch has a clearance of 70 feet, a span of 135 feet and its top deck is 103 feet high.

North Arch
South Arch

Here’s a video taken at the South Arch…

A sign at the park provided this description as to how these arches were formed:

Weaker layers of sandstone form the base of the nearly vertical walls of this narrow ridge. The weathering of these erosion-susceptible layers caused sections of the wall to fall away, forming shallow rock shelters on both sides of the ridge.

The collapse and shelter enlarging process continued until two “windows” in the narrow ridge were formed. This opening enlarged until it reached the stronger and more erosion-resistant sandstone layer of rim rock that caps the Twin Arches.

A cave was situated under one end of the South Arch, so I entered to discover that there was an exit at the back, albeit a narrow passage at approx. 18″ wide. Footprint-impressions in the sand from hikers provided some assurance that the cave was empty – no bats or bears. But, watch your step & don’t bump your head!

Here’s a short video as I entered the cave…

The top of the arches are one contiguous surface area, accessible by stairs, though the South Arch has additional areas visitors may ascend so as to attain the best view:

At the pinnacle, scenic views were truly spectacular on this fine day – unique walls of eroded sandstone, mountains and valleys lined with trees, and an interesting cap-rock area to walkabout. Here are a few examples:

Here’s a video of the surrounding environment –

Partial Map of Park

The only complaint I had while visiting the Twin Arches is Divide Road. As soon as you leave TN-154, you can expect to travel for nearly 5 miles along a gravel road which is narrow with frequent & deep potholes, many hidden by shadows from trees lining the road. So, to be safe, I drove this stretch at less than 10 m.p.h..

Keep in mind, however, that the most impressive sights to see at the Twin Arches are at ground level. So, stay tuned for Part Two